mkxauth



mkxauth(1x)                   Linux User’s Manual                  mkxauth(1x)




NAME

       mkxauth - create and merge .Xauthority files


SYNOPSIS

       (1) mkxauth [ -q ] [ -u login ] -c [ host [ host ... ] ]

       (2) mkxauth [ -q ] [ -u login ] -m login

       (3) mkxauth [ -q ] [ -u login ] -f host

       (4) mkxauth [ -q ] [ -u login ] -r host [ -l login ]

       (5) mkxauth [ -q ] [ -u login ] -z host [ -l login ]


DESCRIPTION

       mkxauth  aids  in  the  creation  and  maintenance  of X authentication
       databases (.Xauthority files).  Use it to create a  ~/.Xauthority  file
       or  merge  keys  from another local or remote .Xauthority file.  Remote
       .Xauthority files can be retrieved via  FTP  (using  ncftp(1))  or  via
       rsh(1).   For a slight measure of security, mkxauth does not create any
       temporary files containing authentication keys (although anyone  spying
       on  network  packets  can  see the authentication key data as they pass
       through the network; for secure network communications, use ssh(1)).

   Creating and Adding to a .Xauthority File
       To create a .Xauthority file, use mkxauth -c (see (1) above).   mkxauth
       creates  a .Xauthority file in the user’s home directory (~/), contain-
       ing a ‘key’ or ‘magic cookie’ for the host  it  was  run  on  (the  one
       returned  by  hostname(1)).   If a .Xauthority file already exists, the
       keys are added to it.  If keys for that host already  exist,  they  are
       replaced.

       To create or add to a .Xauthority file for another user, use mkxauth -u
       login -c.  mkxauth adds keys to ~login/.Xauthority (only the root  user
       is allowed to do this).

       To  add  a key for more than one host, specify all hosts on the command
       line: mkxauth -c daffy porky bugs.  All hosts  specified  on  the  same
       command line receive the same key.  To create different keys for multi-
       ple hosts, run mkxauth for each host in succession:

              mkxauth -c daffy
              mkxauth -c porky
              mkxauth -c bugs

   Merging Keys from Local .Xauthority Files
       To merge keys from another local user’s .Xauthority file,  use  mkxauth
       -m  login (see (2) above).  mkxauth adds the keys in ~login/.Xauthority
       to ~/.Xauthority, replacing any keys which already exist.  ~login/.Xau-
       thority must be readable by the user running mkxauth (normally only the
       root user can read other people’s .Xauthority files).

   Merging Keys via FTP
       To merge keys from a remote .Xauthority file via FTP,  use  mkxauth  -f
       host  (see  (3)  above).  mkxauth retrieves the remote .Xauthority from
       host using ncftp(1) and adds those keys to ~/.Xauthority, replacing any
       keys  which already exist.  [NOTE: you must have a ~/.netrc file set up
       to automatically log you into host, otherwise  the  FTP  login  attempt
       will fail.]

   Merging Keys via rsh(1)
       To  merge  keys from remote .Xauthority file via rsh(1), use mkxauth -r
       host (see (4) above).  mkxauth retrieves the  remote  .Xauthority  from
       host  using  rsh(1) and adds those keys to ~/.Xauthority, replacing any
       keys which already exist.  To login as a different user, use -l  login.
       [NOTE:  you  must have a .rhosts file set up properly for this to work,
       otherwise the remote login attempt will fail].

   Merging Keys via rsh(1) and gzip(1)
       If your remote .Xauthority file is large, or to make it  slightly  less
       obvious  that you’re transferring authentication keys over the network,
       mkxauth can gzip(1) your .Xauthority  file  before  retrieving  it  via
       rsh(1).   To  do  this,  use  mkxauth -z host (see (5) above).  mkxauth
       retrieves the remote .Xauthority from host using rsh(1) and adds  those
       keys  to  ~/.Xauthority,  replacing  any  keys which already exist.  To
       login as a different user, use  -l  login.   [NOTE:  you  must  have  a
       .rhosts  file  set  up  properly for this to work, otherwise the remote
       login attempt will fail].

   Options
       To make mkxauth operate quietly, use the -q option.

       To add to ~login/.Xauthority, use the -u login option.

       To use login for the remote login in mkxauth -f, mkxauth -r,  and  mkx-
       auth -z, use the -l login option.

   Getting Help
       To get quick help about mkxauth, use mkxauth --help.


FILES

       ~/.Xauthority
       ~/.netrc
       ~/.rhosts


COMMENTS

       mkxauth  is mostly useful for maintaining .Xauthority files in an envi-
       ronment which uses startx(1x).  xdm(1x) uses its own method of generat-
       ing  .Xauthority files.  However, mkxauth is still useful for transfer-
       ring .Xauthority information to remote login sessions so that the  user
       can  display  remote X clients on the local host without too much trou-
       ble.

       Note, however, that using rsh(1) is inherently insecure, and sites con-
       cerned    about    security    should    use    ssh(1)   instead   (see
       http://www.cs.hut.fi/ssh/ for more information).


SEE ALSO

       X(1x), Xsecurity(1x), gzip(1), mcookie(1), md5sum(1), ncftp(1), rsh(1),
       startx(1x), xauth(1x), xdm(1x)


BUGS

       Does not respect the XAUTHORITY environment variable.


AUTHOR

       Conceived  and  written by Jim Knoble <jmknoble@redhat.com>.  Copyright
       1996 by Jim Knoble and Red Hat Software.  Distributed under the GNU GPL
       (General Public License); see ftp://prep.ai.mit.edu/pub/gnu/COPYING for
       more information.



Red Hat Software                  12-Dec-1996                      mkxauth(1x)

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